Reporting and Assistance FAQs

Q: I know someone who experienced gender discrimination, sexual assault, or sexual violence. What should I do?

A: A confidential resource is also available to offer you information and help you understand reporting options and ways to support the individual. Call 541.346.SAFE or learn more at What is a Confidential Resource?

Q: What is the difference between reporting methods?

A: The primary difference between reporting to the university and reporting to a confidential advocate is the manner in which the incident will be resolved. When the university becomes aware of an incident of gender discrimination, sexual harassment, or sexual violence, Title IX obligates the university to address and resolve the incident. More information at What Happens When I Make a Report?

Reporting to the Dean of Students, Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity, or the University Police Department (even anonymously), are equivalent to reporting directly to the Title IX Coordinator.

Q: If I share information with a professor or graduate employee, do they have to report the incident to the university?

A: Under the current reporting policy, yes. All university employees, including faculty and graduate employees, are designated “responsible employees.” This means that any employee who is made aware of an incident of gender discrimination or sexual harassment needs to report the information to the Title IX Coordinator.

A new policy, effective September 15, 2017, creates three categories of reporting obligations. More information at Employee Reporting Responsibility Guide

Q: Why should I make an official report?

A: Making an official report allows the university to promptly address the incident, offer supports to affected students and/or employees, and ensure the safety of all campus community members. More information at Resources and Assistance

Q: Can I talk to someone to better understand my options before making a report?

A: There are numerous confidential resources on and off campus that can help you understand your options. More information at What is a Confidential Resource?

If you or someone you know has experienced gender discrimination, sexual harassment, including dating or domestic violence and stalking, or sexual violence, call 541.346.SAFE to speak with a confidential advocate. Information is also available at https://safe.uoregon.edu/know-your-options.

Q: If I make an official report, will my name and other personal information be kept confidential?

A: Making an official report means that you are making the university aware of an incident of gender discrimination, sexual harassment, or sexual violence. The university is therefore obligated to promptly assess and resolve the incident. If the Title IX Coordinator, in consultation with the Director of Student Conduct or Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity, determines formal investigation is needed, your name and the allegation will be included in the Notice of Allegations and Investigation. More information at General Statement on Protecting Privacy

A confidential advocate is always available to discuss your reporting options. More information at What is a Confidential Resource?

Q: What happens if I report to a Deputy Title IX Coordinator?

A: Reporting to a Deputy Title IX Coordinator is equivalent to reporting directly to the Title IX Coordinator and is an official report to the university.

Q: Can I file a complaint outside of the University?

A: The Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Education has the authority to investigate complaints claiming the university discriminated on the basis of sex or gender.

Filing a complaint outside of the university limits the ability of the Office of the Title IX Coordinator, Office of Crisis Intervention and Sexual Violence Support Services, and other campus entities to provide support and resources to the affected individuals. More information at Resolving a Complaint